Tuesday, April 27, 2010

Are The Gulf States And Arizona Ensuring A California Economic Recovery?

The recent oil spill off the coast of Louisiana due to an exploding off shore oil platform is a major disaster looming. The environmental implications of millions of gallons of oil flowing into the sea with no end in sight have fishermen (and women) all over the gulf coast on edge tonight.


The lust for off shore oil profits along the gulf coast may doom the environment as well as the white sand beaches that tourists start flocking to about this time of year. The loss of tourism do to oily beaches could doom the hotel and restaurant industries there for years. This could possible kill thousands of jobs and businesses that rely on the sea food, beaches and tourists to keep them going.

The state of Arizona with the recent signing of the nations most strict immigration laws is chasing away tourists. Several conventions have already been cancelled by groups that no longer find Arizona a desirable place to do business.

This will effect restaurants and hotels in that state.

Sending Mexicans back south may free up some jobs but those may go away anyway because of the perceived police state that no longer sounds tourist friendly.

Both regions are shooting themselves in the foot or the pocket book.

Where can tourists go for long unspoiled beaches, fresh sea food, dairy from happy cows,  loads of world class entertainment, wine and some of the most scenic vistas in the entire world? California!

And here is the kicker...

If you live in one of the other 49 states in the US, you don't even have to bring your birth certificate or passport to have a good time. We expect to see you soon!

13 comments:

  1. You need to have your identification on you at all times. If, in your haste to get to the beach, you were to J-walk, an officer might cite you. In order to issue the citation, you will need to produce ID. If you do not have ID, you will be taken into custody pending your identification. It happens everyday all across the country. No big deal for those of us who do not violate laws and carry our ID.

    "The state of Arizona with the recent signing of the nations most strict immigration laws is chasing away tourists. Several conventions have already been cancelled by groups that no longer find Arizona a desirable place to do business." The language of Arizona's law is consistent with federal law.

    "Sending Mexicans back south may free up some jobs but those may go away anyway because of the perceived police state that no longer sounds tourist friendly." Contrary to your statement, I think tourists will be happy to enjoy the sites and scenes of Arizona without giving their immigration laws a second thought.

    "Where can tourists go for long unspoiled beaches, fresh sea food, dairy from happy cows, loads of world class entertainment, wine and some of the most scenic vistas in the entire world? California!" Don't forget to mention our high crime rates in metropolitan/tourist areas (they are not allowed to carry anything that might be construed to be a weapon for personal protection and might therefore have to fight for their life for 5 to 10 minutes while waiting for police to arrive), some of the highest taxes, and certainly the most poorly educated residents. They won't be able to stay long because their vehicle probably won't meet Ca. emission standards, we have few jobs, and no water.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I suspect Arizona's new draconian Immigration Law is going to be challenged in the courts.

    Call it what you will, it's going to unjustly profile Hispanics. Those angry Arizonia lawmakers claim it won't result in profiling Hispanics - but anyone with half a brain and a sense of reality, knows that's not true.

    What about the treatment of immigrants from other countries? Surprise! We're already profiling them (Google list of countries where immigrants and visitors are put on our "No-Fly" spy lists).

    ReplyDelete
  3. "new draconian Immigration Law"
    Dave,
    It is no newer or more sever than federal laws which are not being enforced.
    Just because a law is immigration-related does not mean it is going to lead to abuse of authority by officers who ask an ice-cream vendor for their peddler's permit. No ID? Then off to jail to be identified. That's normal and to add an immigration element is simply long over-due.
    Humboldt County has a homeless problem that I think is disproportionate to Orange County. Orange County has an immigration problem disproportionate to Humboldt County. How our communities deal with their respective local problems is really a local issue that may differ from region to region. Arizona's law makes simply makes the border issue a State issue. I think D.C.'s remoteness to the problem is why the folks in D.C. don't get it. I don't no for sure but I would imagine most of the foreign people in D.C. are able to take care of themselves and are not particularly burdensome on the other residents.

    I just read that the feds busted up a clown house. (A clown house is like a clown car where you see person after person after person coming out and you wonder how they all fit.) The feds only act when there is pressure from D.C. They'll make another bust or two and that is supposed to show the world that they are doing their job and the Arizona law is not needed. Nice dog and pony show. When the minutemen showed up, the National Guard came down to "help". All they did, according to border patrol agents, was clear a few roads and help fix some vehicles. It was a nice show of force but it lacked they power to do anything. Where is the National Guard now? The Border Patrol Agents in the field are the ONLY feds doing their job. Everyone else in the federal government is asleep at the wheel.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Greg the National Guard is probably in Iraq or Afganistan.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Exactly. If Obama was serious about protecting the U.S., he would START with our borders.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I'd like to share the following quote by Michael Gerson from his article today in the Washington Post if I may: A TEST OF ARIZONIA'S POLITICAL CHARACTER...excerpt:

    "Gov. Jan Brewer, who signed the law, looked flustered when asked during a news conference the obvious question of how illegal immigrants might be identified. "I do not know what an illegal immigrant looks like," Brewer replied. "I can tell you that I think that there are people in Arizona that assume they know what an illegal immigrant looks like. I don't know if they know that for a fact or not." Yet Brewer has ordered Arizona police to be trained in the warning signs of illegality -- signs that she cannot describe. There is a reason no Arizona official has publicly detailed these standards -- because the descriptions would sound like racial stereotyping. And probably would be."

    ReplyDelete
  7. Question: Is racial profiling illegal or just politically incorrect?

    ReplyDelete
  8. George Will: "But Arizona's statute is not presumptively unconstitutional merely because it says that police officers are now required to try to make "a reasonable attempt" to determine the status of a person "where reasonable suspicion exists" that the person is here illegally. The fact that the meaning of "reasonable" will not be obvious in many contexts does not make the law obviously too vague to stand. The Bill of Rights – the Fourth Amendment – proscribes "unreasonable searches and seizures." What "reasonable" means in practice is still being refined by case law – as is that amendment's stipulation that no warrants shall be issued "but upon probable cause." There has also been careful case-by-case refinement of the familiar and indispensable concept of "reasonable suspicion."

    Brewer says, "We must enforce the law evenly, and without regard to skin color, accent or social status." Because the nation thinks as Brewer does, airport passenger screeners wand Norwegian grandmothers. This is an acceptable, even admirable, homage to the virtue of "evenness" as we seek to deter violence by a few, mostly Middle Eastern, young men."

    ReplyDelete
  9. Governor Brewer also thinks that the voting machines she bought for Arizona as Sec. of State are certified and accurate.
    Good luck enforcing the law with this nut job incharge. See link at brad blog.

    www.bradblog.com/?p=6490

    Brewer had 100-thousand people removed from the voting rolls in AZ and the BBC called her out on it. They came to town asked her about the incident. They said, you have the names and addresses of all 100 thousand of them, pick one that we can film as you have them arrested for breaking the law. She responded that the had no proof that any of them had broken the law.

    I feel for the good people of Arizona for they are not in control of that state anymore.

    ReplyDelete
  10. The voting machines are a bad idea. I don't know about Brewer but let's consider why someone's voter registration me be invalidated. Cross-referencing the voter database with death records might lead to a few people being taken off the roll. Registration forms that are not filled out completely could also lead to being omitted. I would imagine there could be other reasons as well. I don't have enough facts in front of me to pass judgment on Brewer with respect to WHY she took people off the voter role.

    Also, any person in the United State can walk into an precinct and request a provisional ballot regardless of their voter status or residency. This is permitted because we recognize that the People's ability to vote is one of the single most important rights we have.

    I have worked as a poll worker in OC and found that election laws, at least here, are not enforced at all. No one has to show identification which means I could walk in and vote on behalf of my wife without them checking my ID. It also means I could look up the role sheets which are public record, see who has NOT voted in the last 5 elections (also public record) and then grab 20 of my closest paid friends to go vote as those people. It happens in OC and many other areas of California. We need to get tougher on our candidates and tougher on voter fraud.

    If you don't like Brewer, I hope you like Arpaio. I spoke with Sheriff Joe Arpaio last week and he said his wife wanted him to run for governor. A formal announcement should be coming out in the next few days or so.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Arpaio puts inmates in tents in the desert and feeds them out of date frozen food that he gets at a bargain. That in itself is no reason to dislike him but here are 10 reasons he should retire.

    http://www.arpaio.com/top-ten/index.php

    He seems to attract lawsuits.

    http://www.azcentral.com/news/articles/2008/04/25/20080425manning-letter0425.html

    ReplyDelete
  12. Funny how the Republicans always worry about the voter fraud but not election fraud.
    Here in little Humboldt County where everyone knows everyone, we discovered that Diebold voting machines were in accurate. Each machine lost almost 200 votes just by hitting a button.
    The number is 197 votes per machine. How many machines would they have in a place the size of Orange County? Times 197 and you can see that election fraud is more likely than people going to all that work and risking being thrown in jail just to add a few votes for a candidate or issue.
    Brewer knows this but ignores it and even went so far as to call the people that pointed this out to her, anti American!
    That woman is off her rocker and should not be in charge of anything higher than dog catcher.

    Here's a link to the Humboldt County story.
    http://www.bradblog.com/?p=7016

    ReplyDelete
  13. Nice blog .. I never thought that you going to write about it:) thanks a lot

    buy viagra

    generic viagra

    ReplyDelete

What In The World Are They Spraying?

Wall St. Gets $16 Trillion We Get Nothing

Ignorance Is Strength

Some things don't add up

US Senator Joe Liberman, WTC 7 Did Not Occur

Architects and engineer’s upcoming documentary

Dr. Steven Jones part 2 of 2 on why steel buildings melt or the basics of Thermite